The Ten Most Important Things
You Need to Know About Homeschooling

1. Homeschooling is life changing. It creates personal growth for both the parent and the child. You (the parent) get a second chance to re-discover your own special genius, while you help your children discover theirs. Nothing you will ever do will have a more profound effect on your child and your family's future as homeschooling.

2. You are qualified to homeschool your children if you love to read to them, love to spend time with them, love to explore the world with them, love to see them learn new things and, most important, love them. 

3. Children love to learn. It is as natural to them as breathing. They have an inborn hunger to explore the world and examine what is interesting. They learn by following their interests, with one interest leading to another. This is the way we all learned as younger children and how as adults we learn after we leave school. Homeschooling families learn together and know that learning is a life-long process.

4. Homeschooling is legal everywhere in the United States, but homeschooling laws vary from state to state. The three basic categories for homeschooling laws are: home education laws, private school laws, and equivalency laws. The best way to find out what your state laws are is to contact a local support group in your area. To contact a representative from your state, please visit our list of local homeschooling groups. They are well versed in your states particular laws and regulations and can assist you.

5. It does not take six to eight hours a day to homeschool your child. Most of the time children spend at school consists of waiting. Design a plan that works for your family and be prepared to scratch it several times and start over. Don't sacrifice your family's happiness to "school" your children. There are many ways families homeschool; find what works for you and your family.

6. Your child will not become a social misfit. Children do not need to be socialized in a large group of same-age children to become well adjusted socially. Quite the opposite. Most parents want their children to learn their social graces from adults, not other children. Homeschoolers have healthy relationships with people of all ages, including the new mother next door, the retired couple who loves to garden, their friends at ballet, 4-H and Karate and, most important, their parents.

7. You will not have to teach algebra unless you really want to. It is not necessary to teach pre-algebra to ten year olds. When your teen decides to become a scientist, or is ready to explore the requirements of college admission, together you will explore the ways they can learn algebra: in a community college class, with a tutor, or through text books.  After years of using math in their daily lives, homeschooled teens are well equipped to teach themselves higher math. Don't worry about it when they are ten.

8. You will question yourself a lot. Maybe several times a day in the beginning. This is normal. Find a fellow homeschooling friend. Support each other. Tell each other that it's okay to sometimes feel that your children didn't seem to learn anything on a given day. They did, and so did you! 

9. You do not have to starve or live in a tent to homeschool your children. Thousands of homeschooling families are able to make the money they need and homeschool their children at the same time. While you create a family business or dream job, or restructure your current job, your children will learn the most important skill of all- how to create the life of their dreams.

10. Trust in your child. They learned how to love, smile, crawl, walk, talk, run, dress themselves, and understand their world before starting school, and they will continue to grow and learn without school.

http://www.homeschool.com/articles/mostimportant/default.asp













Reacties

Antoni van Leeuwenhoek: Van Leeuwenhoek was een autodidact: zonder enige natuurwetenschappelijke opleiding en zonder kennis van vreemde talen leerde hij zichzelf in een achtervertrek van de winkel de kunst van het observeren en beschrijven. Maar hij was ook een verbazingwekkende vakman die zichzelf glas leerde blazen, slijpen en polijsten. In tegenstelling tot de samengestelde microscoop van Hooke klemde Van Leeuwenhoek vrijwel altijd één lens tussen twee metalen plaatjes, het te bestuderen onderwerp werd met schroeven vastgeklemd en in een positie geplaatst zodat het scherp kon worden waargenomen.

Eise Eisinga:
Eisinga werd geboren als zoon van een wolkammer. Hoewel hij hoogbegaafd was, mocht hij niet naar het gymnasium. Op zijn vijftiende gaf hij al een wiskundeboek uit van ruim 650 pagina's. Op zijn zeventiende gaf hij een boekje uit over de grondslagen van de astronomie. Ook zijn broer Stephanus Jeltes was geïnteresseerd in wis- en sterrenkunde. Eisinga werd wolkammer en bekwaamde zich in de snipperuurtjes door zelfstudie aan de Franeker Akademie in de wiskunde en de astronomie. Hij verdiepte zich in zonnewijzers, en publiceerde een boek met tekeningen van zo'n 150 zonnewijzers.

Thuisonderwijs = Passend onderwijs bij uitstek
Thuisonderwijs haalt het beste in het kind naar boven
Thuisonderwijs is het antwoord op Dekkers ambitieuze ideeën
Thuisonderwijs; in het belang van het kind.
Thuisonderwijs: leren eten, praten, lopen, lezen, fietsen, rekenen, etc
Thuisonderwijs: toppunt van ouderbetrokkenheid
Thuisonderwijs: geen pest-/drugs-/wapen protocollen nodig
Thuisonderwijs: socialiseren met mensen van ALLE leeftijden
Thuisonderwijs: een manier van leven
Thuisonderwijs: geen peer-pressure
Thuisonderwijs: Charles Dickens
Thuisonderwijs: Charlie Chaplin
Thuisonderwijs: Isaac Newton
Thuisonderwijs: Thomas Alva Edison
Thuisonderwijs: Pierre & Marie Curie
Thuisonderwijs: dr. Abraham Kuyper (tot 12jr)
Thuisonderwijs: Mark Twain (Samuel L. Clemens)

Thuisonderwijs: Felix Mendelssohn
Thuisonderwijs: Abraham Lincoln
etc: http://www.famoushomeschoolers.net/scientists.html#.Uiyy_X-8qHM

   

 
























Reacties

Fact or Fiction

Revisiting the Common Myths About Homeschooling.

By Michael H. Romanowski.

The Clearing House 79.3 (Jan-Feb 2006): p125(5)

Apple argues that "if one of the marks of the growing acceptance of ideological changes is their positive presentation in the popular media, then home schooling clearly found a place in our consciousness" (2000, 256). The popular media offers positive portrayals of homeschooling in the national press, television, and radio talk shows, and numerous widely read popular magazines. The American public sees and reads about homeschooled students who win or do well in national spelling and geography competitions; homeschooled students who enter prestigious universities; and how universities now recruit and accommodate homeschooled students. They see the results of various studies about homeschoolers' academic achievements compared to their public school counterparts.

Furthermore, the movement has been growing steadily over the past few years. Almost 1.1 million children were homeschooled last year, according to the latest survey conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics. That represents a 29 percent increase from 1999. However, in the midst of a significant growth in this form of education and evidence demonstrating that homeschooling produces excellent students and citizens, many people, including educators, are still plagued by various myths regarding homeschooling. In what follows, I revisit four common myths that still influence individuals regarding their perspective and understanding of the role homeschooling plays in the education of American children. 

Myth #1: Homeschooling Produces Social Misfits

This myth stems from the thought that homeschooled students lack the social skills needed to function "normally" in today's society. Critics charge that homeschooled children are isolated from the outside world, rendering them socially and educationally handicapped. Among these critics are professional educators. Mayberry et al. (1995) found that 92 percent of public school superintendents surveyed believed homeschooled children do not receive adequate socialization experiences. The common argument is that by sheltering children from the real world, they are seldom presented with the opportunities to learn greatly needed knowledge and social interaction skills. Unless children are exposed to the social life found in public schools on a daily basis, they will lack the skills needed to successfully adapt to real-life situations when they are older.

Reality

Probably the most widely held misconception of homeschooling is the myth of socialization. This myth was born out of a misunderstanding of what homeschooling is really like and rests on the assumption that school is the only effective means for socializing children. The mistaken belief is that homeschooled children wake up and hit the books from 9:00 till 4:00, locked away in their homes with little interaction with the outside world. They are socially awkward, lack essential social skills, and have difficulty relating to others in social situations. However, this is simply an outdated stereotype. Yes, there are some homeschooled students who are social misfits, but there are also public school students who lack adequate social skills. 

The term "socialization" is important to define before addressing its relationship to homeschooling. According to Medlin (2000), different people mean different things regarding socialization. For some, the term centers on social activity where children are given time to interact and play with friends and participate in extracurricular activities like sports or theater. Others are concerned with the social influence, where children learn to conform to cultural norms. Finally, some people mean social exposure or introducing children to the culture and values of different groups of people. Although these are all a part of socialization, Durkin defines the concept as the "process whereby people acquire the rules of behavior and systems of beliefs and attitudes that equip a person to function effectively as a member of a particular society" (1995, 614). The process of socialization usually occurs in a child's daily activities as he or she interacts with individuals, the community, and culture at large.

It seems that most homeschool parents are aware of the issue of socialization and are strongly committed to providing positive socialization opportunities for their children. Homeschooled children are involved in numerous activities outside the home with peers, children of different ages, and adults (Ray 1999). On the average, homeschooled students are involved in 5.2 activities outside the home, with 98 percent engaged in two or more (Ray 1997). This range of activities includes scouting, dance classes, group sports, 4-H, and volunteer work, demonstrating that homeschoolers are not isolated from the outside world.

More important, the assumption that traditional schooling offers socialization experiences that homeschooling cannot is flawed. Schools are not the only place that children can learn these basic life skills. There are other institutions, groups, and activities outside the home that can provide students with age-integrated opportunities to gain needed socialization skills. Nelsen argues that "home schooled children are more frequently exposed to a wider variety of people and situations than could be expected in a traditional classroom environment where their exposure is limited to twenty-five to thirty-five people of similar age and socioeconomic background" (1998, 35). This seems to be an advantage for homeschoolers. From research findings, Galloway (as cited in Medlin 2000) concludes that because homeschooled students are not peer-grouped in school, they learn to get along with a variety of people, making them socially mature and able to adjust to new situations. The key question that should be raised is what kind of socialization does the public school offer? For homeschool parents, the home and not public schools offers the kind of socialization that they desire for their children. 

It is also important to understand that a child's self-concept and the socialization process are closely related. The majority of studies done on homeschoolers indicate that their self-concepts are comparable to and usually stronger than that of children in conventional schools. Ray (1989) discusses several studies that indicate that homeschool students' social development is comparable to or more advanced than that of public school students. For example, Taylor (1986) focused on the self-concept as a significant aspect of a child's psychological development. Taylor employed the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale (PHCSCS) to measure the central core of personality with homeschooled children in grades 4-12. The results of the nationwide study revealed that homeschooled students scored significantly higher than public school students for the global scale and all six subscales of the PHCSCS, indicating that these particular homeschooled students have a higher and more positive self-concept than the public school students. The conclusion is that insofar as self-concept reflects socialization, homeschoolers are neither socially deprived nor inferior regarding socialization (Taylor 1986). 

Kelley (1991) utilized the PHCSCS and concluded that the self-concepts of homeschooled students in suburban Los Angeles were significantly higher than conventionally schooled students. Medlin (1994) examined various predictors of achievement and found that homeschoolers' academic self-concept was above the national average. Smedley (as cited in Ray 1999) evaluated the communication skills, socialization, and daily living skills of public school and homeschooled students and found that the homeschooled students were significantly better socialized and more mature than their public school counterparts. 

Opponents of homeschooling often raise concerns for gender issues. Regarding gender, Sheffer (1995) argues that facilitating peer-dependency is part of how schools shortchange girls. In a study of self-esteem among adolescent girls, she found that unlike their public school counterparts, homeschooled girls did not typically lose confidence in themselves when their ideas and opinions were not embraced by their peers. 

No one knows for certain what is the best kind of socialization for children or what makes for a healthy child and by no means are all homeschooled children well adjusted. This is not to say that homeschooling is the only way for parents to educate their children. But there is ample research indicating that homeschooling offers more than just educational benefits, and this may be the reason for the growing number of parents opting for home education. 

Myth #2: Homeschooling Fails to Prepare Good Citizens 

In August 2001, Time magazine raised the issue of citizenship and homeschooling by asking the question, "Is Home Schooling Good for America?" The concern was that homeschooling may turn out better students, but does it create better citizens? The argument was that homeschooling isolated students from the world, including political and social involvement. Furthermore, homeschooling centers on the best interest of the individual rather than public schools' concern for the best interest for society as a whole.

Reality

Today, the first generation of homeschooled students have grown up and have entered America's workforce, colleges, and universities. But, are they good citizens compared to the general U.S. population? A recent report, "Home Schooling Crows Up," released by Dr. Brian Ray, argues that "home schooling produces successful adults who are actively involved in their communities and continue to value education for themselves and their children" (2003, 6). The study surveyed more than seventy-three hundred adults who were homeschooled, with more than five thousand of these being homeschooled for at least seven years. Their responses and results demonstrate that homeschooled students are excellent citizens compared to the general U.S. population.

For example, one element of being a good citizen is a person's level of engagement in civic and political affairs. According to these findings, only 4.2 percent of homeschool graduates consider politics and government too complicated to understand, compared to 35 percent of U.S. adults. Ray demonstrates that homeschool graduates are more actively involved in their communities than the general U.S. population. The following statistics illustrate this point:

* Seventy-one percent of homeschool graduates participate in an ongoing community service activity, compared to 37 percent of U.S. adults of similar ages.

* Eighty-eight percent of the homeschool graduates surveyed are members of an organization (such as a community group, church, or professional organization) compared to 50 percent of U.S. adults.

* Homeschool graduates are more likely to contribute money to a political party and are more likely to work for a political party or cause.

* Seventy-six percent of homeschool graduates surveyed between the ages of eighteen and twenty-four voted in a national or state election within the last five years, compared to only 29 percent of the relevant U.S. population.

* Homeschool graduates are more likely to have participated in a protest or boycott, attended a public meeting, wrote, or telephoned a public official or signed a petition more often than the general population. (Ray 2003) 

The bottom line: Homeschool graduates are actively involved in the political process and are more engaged as citizens compared to the general U.S. population.

These findings dispel the myth that homeschoolers withdraw from society and their civic responsibilities. Homeschoolers clearly learn about the real world, possibly more than do their public school counterparts. While the purpose of public education is to educate future citizens who take an active role in improving the social, economic, and political conditions in society, Ray's research indicates that public schools, not homeschooling, should be scrutinized for their efforts regarding "citizenship training." 

What about other aspects of adulthood, such as employment? Knowles (1991) surveyed adults who were homeschooled because of ideology or geographical isolation. None were unemployed or on welfare. Nearly two-thirds were self-employed. In addition, 94 percent of those surveyed stated that their home education prepared them to be independent persons, while 79 percent said it helped them interact with individuals from different levels of society. Knowles argues that because such a large percentage of those surveyed were self-employed, this provides evidence that homeschooling develops an individual's self-reliance and independence. 

It seems that homeschooling creates responsible and productive citizens, which is positive for both the individual and society. Children are benefiting from the homeschool environment and much can be learned from examining what homeschooling families are doing. 

Myth #3: Students Who Are Homeschooled Have Difficulty Entering College

The argument is that without a high school diploma, grades and SAT or ACT test scores, homeschooled students have a difficult time getting into good colleges and universities. In addition, when homeschooled students enter college, they have a very difficult time relating to other students and have difficulty facing the academic challenges. Since their schooling experiences are limited to their homeschool setting, they are at a disadvantage with their postsecondary studies.

Reality 

Every year homeschoolers are admitted to hundreds of colleges and universities in at least five countries. Many of these schools of higher education are selective colleges that most parents dream about their children attending. The list includes such prestigious schools as Brown, Georgetown, Harvard, MIT, Princeton, the United States Military Academy at West Point, UC at Berkeley, University of Michigan, Notre Dame, and Yale. (1) These colleges and universities provide homeschooled students information regarding admission requirements and financial assistance. Not only do colleges and universities boast that their place of learning is supportive of students who have largely been homeschooled, but universities actively recruit homeschoolers. Many college representatives attend homeschool conferences to talk with students and parents, and admission departments advertise in homeschool publications, communicate with state-wide homeschool organizations, conduct workshops for homeschoolers and their parents to help them plan for college admission and tuition costs, and even offer special scholarships for homeschooled students.

What about SAT and ACT scores? Homeschooled children generally score at or above the national averages on standardized tests. The ACT publisher reported scores of 1,926 homeschooled students from the graduating class of 1997. These students scored higher than the national average in English, reading, and the overall composite of the ACT. However, there was little difference regarding reasoning skills (Ray 1999). Evidence indicates that homeschooled children learn the "right" things without attending public schools.

Universities and colleges all over the nation realize that homeschooled students are well prepared for the academic rigor of college life. In analyzing college ability, Calloway and Sutton (as cited in Klicka 2003) found that homeschooled students demonstrate comparable academic preparedness and achievement in college as students from conventional schools. Their conclusion: Homeschooled students perform satisfactorily in college level academic settings. 

Galloway and Sutton (2000) found that homeschoolers who went to college demonstrated no significant social skill deprivation from their homeschool experience. In addition, leadership skills among homeschooled students was substantially higher than their counterparts from the private and public high schools. Finally, homeschoolers exhibit a strong work ethic and high moral values, which play a role in their success in college (Klicka 2003). The reality is that homeschooled children can learn effectively and succeed in college without experiencing traditional forms of schooling. 

Myth #4: Most People Homeschool Only for Religious Reasons 

The stereotypical view of homeschooling families is one of a conservative Christian family who homeschools in order to pass on Christian values to their children and protect them from the world.

Reality

Ironically, the contemporary homeschooling movement began sometime around mid-century as a liberal, rather than a conservative, alternative to public education (Lines 2003). Possibly as many as ten thousand families in the late fifties and early sixties viewed school as too rigidly conservative and pursued a more liberal educational philosophy at home (Lines 2003). Because of judicial decisions considering formal school prayer (Engel v. Vitale 1962) and school-endorsed bible readings (Abington School District v. Schempp 1963) as violations of the First Amendment, conservative Christians became concerned that schools were becoming too secular and slowly families began to enroll their children in private schools while others began homeschooling. Lines points out that "in the 1980's as the school culture drifted to the left, conservative and religious families were surprised to find themselves in a countercultural position" (2003, 13-14). 

However, religious and conservative families are not the only ones homeschooling their children. Romanowski argues that one of the unique aspects of the homeschool community is that it appeals to "a demographic diversity that includes virtually all races, religions, socioeconomic groups and political viewpoints. There are conservatives who consider public education too liberal, liberals who consider it too conservative, and those who are driven by religious convictions" (2003, 82). Both the political left and right of homeschooling are active today. 

Although there are different reasons families choose to homeschool their children, Van Calen appropriately places homeschoolers into two distinct categories: ideologues and pedagogues. The ideologues argue that they homeschool their children for two reasons: "they object to what they believe is being taught in public and private schools, and they seek to strengthen their relationships with their children" (Van Galen 1988, 55). These parents have specific beliefs, values, and skills that they want their children to learn and embrace. Because they are convinced that these things are not being adequately taught in public school, they opt for homeschooling to assure that their children are provided numerous and genuine opportunities to learn this knowledge. 

The ideologues' argument is essentially religiously based and criticizes the values and beliefs that are taught within public schools. It is often the case that "these parents view the public schools as grounded in secular humanist philosophy that does not include strong Christian values" (Marchant and MacDonald 1994, 66). Their dispute moves beyond issues like school prayer and argues that public schools fail to take religion seriously throughout the curriculum. This becomes problematic for these families because "their religious beliefs and the education of their children were inextricably intertwined" (Marchant and MacDonald 1994, 77). These parents have a strong concern for their children's moral, ethical, and spiritual development, and they feel that public schools do not provide appropriate moral or ethical instruction, much less religious values. Therefore, they opt to homeschool their children in an attempt to avoid public school's attempt to strangle religion's influence.

On the other hand, pedagogues teach their children at home primarily for pedagogical reasons. Their main argument is not concerned with the content of public education but rather their belief that whatever public schools teach, they teach ineptly. These parents "share a respect for their children's intellect and creativity and a belief that children learn best when pedagogy taps into the child's innate desire to learn" (Van Galen 1988, 55). Pedagogues homeschool primarily because of what they believe will be educational benefits to their children. These parents have either experienced firsthand or have witnessed children suffering both emotionally and academically because of the schools' shortcomings, and there is a recognition "that the schools are often unwilling or unable to serve children with unique learning styles or scholarly needs" (Van Galen 1988, 57). They challenge the power of public schools to sort, select, and label their children based on what they see as a limited measure of their child's ability. This leads them to believe "that breaking from the traditional formal model of teaching will lead to improved understanding and learning in their children" (Marchant and MacDonald 1994, 66).

Ray (1999) cites various studies and points out several additional reasons parents homeschool their children. First, parents want their children to accomplish more academically than they would in schools. Related to this, parents want an individualized curriculum and learning environment that meets their child's unique needs and strengths. Third, they want to foster family relationships amongst siblings and parents. Fourth, parents want to provide their children with guided and reasoned social interactions with peers and adults rather than letting the school determine this, finally, there are reasons regarding the safety of their children. Whatever the reason, the main issue is that the education of children in the United States should primarily be the responsibility of the parents. Parents have the right to choose how their children should be educated by determining what form of schooling best meets the complex needs of their children.

Conclusion

The essence of a public school system in a democratic society is that the educational system listens critically to the concerns of parents and provides avenues for parental choice. More important, the expectation that public education should adequately serve the needs of children from broad and diverse backgrounds should be reconsidered. Public schools do not, cannot, and probably should not be expected to meet the needs of every child in the community. Instead, parents, schools, and the community need to work together to educate all children, no matter what form of education parents choose. Our main concern should be that education, whatever form it takes, maximizes the potential of all children. Inevitability, this will lead some parents to select alternative and less institutionalized options for their children's education. As educators and community members, we need to respect parents' choices because this is the essence of a democratic educational system. Instead of constantly comparing and contrasting public schools and homeschools, we should look at how each can learn from one another and then use this information to improve the learning experiences of all children, no matter what form of education takes place.

Key words: homeschool myths, education

NOTE

1. To view a list of more than one thousand schools that admit homeschoolers, see http://learninfreedom.org/colleges_4_hmsc.html.

REFERENCES

Apple, M. W. 2000. The cultural politics of home schooling. Peabody Journal of Education 75 (1 and 2): 256-71.

Durkin, K. 1995. Socialization. In The Blackwell encyclopedia of social psychology, ed. A. S. R. Manstead and M. Hewstone, 614-18. Cambridge, MA: Basil Blackwell.

Galloway, R. S., and J. P. Sutton. 2000. College success of students from three high school settings. In Quantitative nonexperimental designs, ed. J. H. McMillan and J. F. Wergin, 65-77. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

Kelley, S. W. 1991. Socialization of home schooled children: A self-concept study. Home School Researcher 7 (4): 1-12.

Klicka, C. J. 2003. Home schooled students excel in college. In At issue: Home schooling, ed. C. Mur, 90-96. Farmington Hills, MI: Greenhaven.

Knowles, J. G. 1991. We've grown up and we're OK: An exploration of adults who were home-educated as students. Paper presented at the 13th National Conference of the New Zealand Association for Research in Education.

Lines, P. M. 2003. Home schooling is becoming more common. In At issue: Home schooling, ed. C. Mur, 12-21. Farmington Hills, MI: Greenhaven.

Marchant, G., and S. MacDonald. 1994. Home schooling parents: An analysis of choices. People and Education 2(1): 65-82.

Mayberry M., J. G. Knowles, B. Ray, and S. Marlow. 1995. Home schooling: Parents as educators. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

Medlin, R. G. 1994. Predictors of academic achievement in home educated children: Aptitude, self-concepts, and pedagogical practices. Home School Researcher 10 (3): 1-7.

______. 2000. Home schooling and the questions of socialization. Peabody Journal of Education 75 (1 and 2): 107-23.

Nelsen, M. B. 1998. Beyond the stereotypes: Home schooling as a legitimate educational alternative. High School Magazine 6 (2): 32-37.

Ray, B. D. 1989. Home schools: A synthesis of research on characteristics and learner outcomes. Education and Urban Society' 21 (1): 16-31.

______. 1997. Strengths of their own: Home schoolers across America. Salem, OR: National Home Education Research Institute.

______. 1999. Home schooling on the threshold: A survey of research at the dawn of the new millennium. Salem, OK: National Home Education Research Institute.

______. 2003. Home schooling grows up. Salem, OR: National Home Education Research Institute.

Romanowski, M. H. 2003. Cooperation between public schools and home-schooling parents is needed. In At issue: Home schooling, ed. C. Mur, 82-86. Farmington Hills, MI: Greenhaven.

Sheffer, S. 1995. Listening to home schooled adolescent girls. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Taylor, J. W. 1986. Self-concept in home-schooling children. PhD diss., Andrews University, Berrien Springs, MI.

Van Galen, J. A. 1988. Ideology, curriculum and pedagogy in home education. Education and Urban Society 21 (1): 52-68.

Michael H. Romanowski is a professor at the Center for Teacher Education at Ohio Northern University in Ada.

Source Citation:Romanowski, Michael H. "Revisiting the common myths about homeschooling." The Clearing House 79.3 (Jan-Feb 2006): 125(5). General OneFile. Gale. St Louis County Library. 23 Oct. 2008
<http://0-find.galegroup.com.iii.slcl.org/itx/start.do?prodId=ITOF>.

Gale Document Number:A144751704


https://sites.google.com/site/stlouishomeschoolers/getting-starte/fact-or-fiction





Reacties

Stop verbod op thuisonderwijs

Deze petitie pleit voor behoud en versteviging van de wettelijke basis van thuisonderwijs (TO).
De staatsecretaris van OCW is van plan om thuisonderwijs (vrijstelling van schoolplicht art. 5.b. LPW) onmogelijk te maken. Dit blijkt uit zijn brief van juli 2013 aan de Tweede Kamer.

Stop het verbod op thuisonderwijs!
Teken deze Petitie.

Meer informatie: www.thuisonderwijs.nl/petitie2013

PETITIE

Wij

Inwoners van Nederland, o.a.
ouders die thuisonderwijs geven en
jongeren die thuisonderwijs krijgen

constateren

Dat:
een kleine groep ouders thuisonderwijs (TO) geeft;
de effectiviteit in onderzoek (cognitief en sociaal-emotioneel) is aangetoond en goed aansluit op vervolgopleiding en arbeidsmarkt;
de Tweede Kamer in 2011 instemde met TO en toezicht;
in veel landen TO een volwaardige onderwijsvorm is;
de Onderwijsraad adviseerde het recht op onderwijs te regelen, zonder TO te verbieden;
de staatsecretaris OCW desondanks van plan is om TO te verbieden.

en verzoeken

Behoud en versteviging van de wettelijke basis voor thuisonderwijs door:
a. behoud van de mogelijkheid tot vrijstelling van schoolplicht (Leerplichtwet art. 5b);
dan wel:
b. losmaking van de keuze voor thuisonderwijs van levensbeschouwelijke bezwaren en inrichting van thuisonderwijs in de Leerplichtwet als uitwerking van de Grondwettelijke vrijheid om onderwijs te geven, waarbij het recht op onderwijs en een passend toezicht gegarandeerd zijn.

http://petities.nl/petitie/stop-verbod-op-thuisonderwijs

Reacties

Vervolg op Sander Dekker VINDT... (hier te lezen)

Hoe krijgt de Staatssecretaris van Onderwijs (dhr Sander Dekker) het toch voor elkaar te VINDEN dat schoolgang in het belang van de kinderen is terwijl 16.000 zogenoemde thuiszitters zijn ongelijk bewijzen. En hoe kun je dan vinden (zonder enkele onderbouwing en dwars tegen de onderzoeken van zelfs zijn eigen OCW in) dat thuisonderwijs niet in het belang van kinderen kan zijn terwijl dit vaak juist voor die kinderen nog de enige mogelijkheid is om kwalitatief goed onderwijs te ontvangen. Hoe kun je vinden en ervan overtuigd zijn dat thuisonderwijs niet in het belang van kinderen is terwijl de geschiedenis van oa dit land en allerlei onderzoeken in de huidige tijd het tegendeel bewijzen. Hoe kun je vinden en ervan overtuigd zijn dat thuisonderwijs niet in het belang van kinderen is terwijl in andere landen universiteiten juist werven onder homeschooled/ thuisonderwezen kinderen omdat die het op alle fronten beter doen dan schoolonderwezen kinderen.

Hoe kun je nu kijken en wijzen naar een land dat in de jaren '30 van de vorige eeuw thuisonderwijs verboden heeft omdat het regime maximale controle wilde kunnen hebben over kinderen en hun propaganda uit wilde kunnen strooien over alle kinderen en de kinderen zoveel mogelijk los moest weken van de ouders voor een doel waar iedereen tegenwoordig nog schande van spreekt en waar veel landen en volken onder te lijden hebben gehad. Hoe kun je dat als weldenkend mens tot voorbeeld nemen ipv landen die wel thuisonderwijs toestaan en waar thuisonderwezen kinderen met graagte naar de universiteiten gehaald worden.

Wat zegt dat over het denken en de overtuiging van de desbetreffende staatssecretaris?





Reacties

 

HOMESCHOOL IS NOT “ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION”

by Steven David Horwich • April 7, 2011 • 

Homeschooling today is looked upon as an “alternative educational” approach. Teachers, teachers unions, politicians and their buddies have worked very hard to try to convince us that homeschool is not “normal”, not “standard”. It is presented as “fringe” education. Who home schools? We are told by “authorities” that it’s largely religious fanatics and “problem children” that were considered too dangerous or slow for schooling.

Let’s debunk these lies.

Historically, schools are the “alternative”. They only flourished in a few places until the 20th century. They usually had a very low success rate with their students. Individual teachers occasionally shined through the grim morass, but schools were not generally held in high regard. This is one reason that teachers and their unions insist at the top of their voices that they deserve respect and sensational paychecks, that teachers are underpaid and overworked, and all that utter rot. Because they know that they are simply not necessary. History does not lie.

Consider the astounding list of people who did NOT receive a “school” based education, but who made a massive impression on the world. Interested in music? Bach and Mozart were homeschooled, that seemed to work out well for them.  You wanted songwriters? How about Irving Berlin, the first great songwriter of the 20th century? How about fine art?  Da Vinci and Monet homeschooled. Most of the founding fathers of the United States were homeschool products, including George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, James Madison, and Thomas Jefferson. Not a bad group to belong to. A few other Presidents along the way also homeschooled, such as Abraham Lincoln and Teddy and Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Was Abe Lincoln’s education really “alternative”?  That’s an alternative road I think most of us would happily walk. Is the military your thing? Such remarkable generals as George C. Patton and Robert E. Lee were homeschooled. How about writers? Hans Christian Anderson, C.S. Lewis, Charles Dickens, George Bernard Shaw and Mark Twain homeschooled. Will they do? There were a few poets, too, including Carl Sandburg and Walt Whitman, perhaps America’s most important. How about scientists? Those with almost no formal education before university included the greatest of all 20th century scientists, Albert Einstein. Inventors? The Wright Brothers homeschooled, ran a bicycle repair shop – and invented the airplane. Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone. Imagine life without that homeschooler! Thomas Edison homeschooled and then invented electric light, audio and film recording, and a list of inventions that made the 20th century possible. Of course, Edison’s invention of film helped create the first movie star, Charlie Chaplin, another homeschooler whose work guaranteed that movies would become the 20th century art form.

There is no area of life where homeschoolers do not stand at the front. The two greatest nurses in history, Florence Nightingale and Clara Barton, were homeschooled. Great businessmen such as Joseph Pulitzer and Andrew Carnegie homeschooled. The great tennis champions, the Williams sisters, both were homeschooled. Folks, even such popular entertainers as Justin Timberlake and Christina Aguilera homeschooled.

This is obviously NOT a list of “alternative” historical figures, but rather a list of many of the central figures in the last 300 years. And since public “mass” schooling has only been the vogue for the past unfortunate 150 years or so, prior to that time, the vast majority of important historical figures had little or no “schooling”.

The numbers are overwhelmingly in favor of homeschooling. Those educated at home throughout history, needless to say, outnumber those schooled by at least a factor of many hundreds to one. Somehow, civilization survived! There are other interesting numbers today, such as “standardized tests” that show homeschoolers receive far better educations than schooled kids, on average.

And of course, children educated at home get sick less often, don’t get beat up by classmates, and as we saw in Colorado this week, they do not get pepper sprayed in school when they “act out”. (You can find out more about this tragic farce at Homeschool Under Siege, our other blog.)

Homeschool is not an alternative. Schooling was made “universal” in the U.S. in the 1860s, and was not welcomed then. It’s just too bad that the farmers who met teachers at the door, who had arrived to trot their children to school, didn’t stand their ground on their children’s behalf. But even then, the majority of Americans, not to mention the rest of the world, homeschooled their children. Considering the awful results of schooling as seen in a deteriorating civilization, I think we should all consider “school” a failed alternative, and junk it.

In education, homeschool has always been the main road. Can anyone claim that the wonderful and brilliant people listed above were not educated? Oh, I’m sure there are teachers and teacher unions who’d love it if you never knew the truth, but here it is… HOMESCHOOLING CAN EASILY PROVIDE A FAR BETTER EDUCATION FOR A CHILD THAN CAN ANY SCHOOL.

The reasons for this are very, very many. (If you really wish to know them, and to take advantage of them, please consider my book, Poor Cheated Little Johnny. It’s available at our site, www.connectthethoughts.com.) Bottom line, the best thing you can do for your child? Homeschool.

- See more at: http://www.connectthethoughts.net/blog/2011/04/homeschool-is-not-%E2%80%9Calternative-education%E2%80%9D/

Placed with permission of Mr Horwich

HOMESCHOOL IS NOT “ALTERNATIVE EDUCATION”

Homeschooling today is looked upon as an “alternative educational” approach. Teachers, teachers unions, politicians and their buddies have worked very hard to try to convince us that homeschool is not “normal”, not “standard”. It is presented as “fringe” education. Who home schools? We are told by “authorities” that it’s largely religious fanatics and “problem children” that were considered too dangerous or slow for schooling.

Let’s debunk these lies.

Historically, schools are the “alternative”. They only flourished in a few places until the 20th century. They usually had a very low success rate with their students. Individual teachers occasionally shined through the grim morass, but schools were not generally held in high regard. This is one reason that teachers and their unions insist at the top of their voices that they deserve respect and sensational paychecks, that teachers are underpaid and overworked, and all that utter rot. Because they know that they are simply not necessary. History does not lie.

Consider the astounding list of people who did NOT receive a “school” based education, but who made a massive impression on the world. Interested in music? Bach and Mozart were homeschooled, that seemed to work out well for them.  You wanted songwriters? How about Irving Berlin, the first great songwriter of the 20th century? How about fine art?  Da Vinci and Monet homeschooled. Most of the founding fathers of the United States were homeschool products, including George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, James Madison, and Thomas Jefferson. Not a bad group to belong to. A few other Presidents along the way also homeschooled, such as Abraham Lincoln and Teddy and Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Was Abe Lincoln’s education really “alternative”?  That’s an alternative road I think most of us would happily walk. Is the military your thing? Such remarkable generals as George C. Patton and Robert E. Lee were homeschooled. How about writers? Hans Christian Anderson, C.S. Lewis, Charles Dickens, George Bernard Shaw and Mark Twain homeschooled. Will they do? There were a few poets, too, including Carl Sandburg and Walt Whitman, perhaps America’s most important. How about scientists? Those with almost no formal education before university included the greatest of all 20th century scientists, Albert Einstein. Inventors? The Wright Brothers homeschooled, ran a bicycle repair shop – and invented the airplane. Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone. Imagine life without that homeschooler! Thomas Edison homeschooled and then invented electric light, audio and film recording, and a list of inventions that made the 20th century possible. Of course, Edison’s invention of film helped create the first movie star, Charlie Chaplin, another homeschooler whose work guaranteed that movies would become the 20th century art form.

There is no area of life where homeschoolers do not stand at the front. The two greatest nurses in history, Florence Nightingale and Clara Barton, were homeschooled. Great businessmen such as Joseph Pulitzer and Andrew Carnegie homeschooled. The great tennis champions, the Williams sisters, both were homeschooled. Folks, even such popular entertainers as Justin Timberlake and Christina Aguilera homeschooled.

This is obviously NOT a list of “alternative” historical figures, but rather a list of many of the central figures in the last 300 years. And since public “mass” schooling has only been the vogue for the past unfortunate 150 years or so, prior to that time, the vast majority of important historical figures had little or no “schooling”.

The numbers are overwhelmingly in favor of homeschooling. Those educated at home throughout history, needless to say, outnumber those schooled by at least a factor of many hundreds to one. Somehow, civilization survived! There are other interesting numbers today, such as “standardized tests” that show homeschoolers receive far better educations than schooled kids, on average.

And of course, children educated at home get sick less often, don’t get beat up by classmates, and as we saw in Colorado this week, they do not get pepper sprayed in school when they “act out”. (You can find out more about this tragic farce at Homeschool Under Siege, our other blog.)

Homeschool is not an alternative. Schooling was made “universal” in the U.S. in the 1860s, and was not welcomed then. It’s just too bad that the farmers who met teachers at the door, who had arrived to trot their children to school, didn’t stand their ground on their children’s behalf. But even then, the majority of Americans, not to mention the rest of the world, homeschooled their children. Considering the awful results of schooling as seen in a deteriorating civilization, I think we should all consider “school” a failed alternative, and junk it.

In education, homeschool has always been the main road. Can anyone claim that the wonderful and brilliant people listed above were not educated? Oh, I’m sure there are teachers and teacher unions who’d love it if you never knew the truth, but here it is… HOMESCHOOLING CAN EASILY PROVIDE A FAR BETTER EDUCATION FOR A CHILD THAN CAN ANY SCHOOL.

The reasons for this are very, very many. (If you really wish to know them, and to take advantage of them, please consider my book, Poor Cheated Little Johnny. It’s available at our site, www.connectthethoughts.com.) Bottom line, the best thing you can do for your child? Homeschool.

- See more at: http://www.connectthethoughts.net/blog/2011/04/homeschool-is-not-%E2%80%9Calternative-education%E2%80%9D/#sthash.Vg0lnXon.dpuf


Reacties

8 Jun 2013

As dissatisfaction with the U.S. public school system grows, apparently so has the appeal of homeschooling. Educational researchers, in fact, are expecting a surge in the number of students educated at home by their parents over the next ten years, as more parents reject public schools.

A recent report in Education News states that, since 1999, the number of children who are homeschooled has increased by 75%. Though homeschooled children represent only 4% of all school-age children nationwide, the number of children whose parents choose to educate them at home rather than a traditional academic setting is growing seven times faster than the number of children enrolling in grades K-12 every year.

As homeschooling has become increasingly popular, common myths that have long been associated with the practice of homeschooling have been debunked.

Any concerns about the quality of education children receive by their parents can be put to rest by the consistently high placement of homeschooled students on standardized assessment exams. Data demonstrates that those who are independently educated generally score between the 65th and 89th percentile on these measures, while those in traditional academic settings average at around the 50th percentile. In addition, achievement gaps between sexes, income levels, or ethnicity—all of which have plagued public schools around the country—do not exist in homeschooling environments.

According to the report:

Recent studies laud homeschoolers’ academic success, noting their significantly higher ACT-Composite scores as high schoolers and higher grade point averages as college students. Yet surprisingly, the average expenditure for the education of a homeschooled child, per year, is $500 to $600, compared to an average expenditure of $10,000 per child, per year, for public school students.

The high achievement level of homeschoolers is readily recognized by recruiters from some of the best colleges in the nation. Home-educated children matriculate in colleges and attain a four-year degree at much higher rates than their counterparts from both public and private schools. Schools such as Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard, Stanford, and Duke Universities all actively recruit homeschoolers.

Similarly, the common myth that homeschoolers “miss out” on so-called “socialization opportunities,” often thought to be a vital aspect of traditional academic settings, has proven to be without merit. According to the National Home Education Research Institute survey, homeschoolers tend to be more socially engaged than their peers and demonstrate “healthy social, psychological, and emotional development, and success into adulthood.”

From the report:

Based on recent data, researchers such as Dr. Brian Ray (NHERI.org) “expect to observe a notable surge in the number of children being homeschooled in the next 5 to 10 years. The rise would be in terms of both absolute numbers and percentage of the K to 12 student population. This increase would be in part because…[1] a large number of those individuals who were being home educated in the 1990’s may begin to homeschool their own school-age children and [2] the continued successes of home-educated students.”

 

Source: http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2013/06/07/Report-Growth-in-Homeschooling-Outpacing-Public-Schools


Reacties

 

Why Homeschool?

 

 

 

Why Parents Love Homeschool


Geldt ook voor Nederlandse thuisonderwijzers!

 




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The Wolrd is Our Classroom

 



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